Posts Tagged "content marketing strategy"


Infographic: Social Media Mistakes Supply Chain Brands Still Make

Infographic: Social Media Mistakes Supply Chain Brands Still Make

Take note: Brands in the supply chain are not immune to these social media mistakes.


Highlights:

  • There will be over 3 billion social media users by 2021
  • Not knowing your audience can cripple your efforts
  • Social media is about connecting – not promoting


Approximately 81%
 of small and medium businesses use a social platform. And we all understand why. By 2021, it is estimated that there will be around 3.02 billion social media users around the globe. That’s a lot of potential customers.

It’s easy to see why companies are jumping on the social media bandwagon. And there’s no disputing that social media is an effective way to increase brand awareness and generate leads. But it can be virtually useless if your company isn’t doing it right.

Are you making any social media mistakes? Check out our list of the biggest blunders we see companies making to find out.

4 social media mistakes supply chain brands are still making

Social Media Mistakes

Mistake #1: Not knowing the audience

You’d be surprised how often we find that brands don’t have a clear idea of their audience on social media. This covers everything from knowing when followers are active to what content hits home with them to other interests followers might have. You need to know who you’re talking to before you start creating and sharing content on social media.

So how do you figure out your audience? First, it’s important to create a detailed description of your target buyer persona – including location, education level, role in the industry, needs and concerns, and anything else that’s relevant. Next — and we can’t say it enough — engage with your audience! Participate in discussions, encourage comments, and pay attention to what your followers are telling you.

Mistake #2: Using objectives instead of strategy

Social media platforms are continually making changes and updates to improve the user experience. In order to weather these changes and keep your audience engaged, it’s imperative to have a clear strategy that includes types of content, frequency, and pillar topics. Posts should reflect your brand, so make sure posts follow style guidelines and reflect your specific tone.

A strategy will also help achieve ROI. Social Media Examiner’s 2018 Social Media Marketing Industry Report found that only 44% of marketers agree that they know how to measure social media ROI. That means two-thirds of marketers don’t know whether or how much their marketing efforts are paying off when it comes to the use of social media. A strategy that incorporates defined goals, tracking, and measuring will help prove ROI and improve your social media presence.

Mistake #3: Using the most popular social media platforms

Not all social media platforms are created equal. In fact, all social media channels have a differentiating quality that makes them appealing to specific audiences.

Start by identifying where your target audience is spending their time. For example, 81% of millennials view their Twitter account on a daily basis. If your company is looking to capture millennials as leads, your social media efforts should certainly include Twitter.

Once you’ve determined where you should be posting, concentrate on creating content that caters to those specific platforms. Lots of companies post the same content across all of the apps they use. We understand how easy that is for marketers, especially with automation tools. But the foundation of social engagement is authenticity, something that is hard to achieve when posts are the same across all channels. Work to create content — including video and images — that caters to specific platforms to build brand awareness and loyalty.

Mistake #4: Promoting instead of connecting

This one may be the cardinal sin of social media. These platforms are all about engagement. Users don’t want to engage with brands that are pushing their products and services. Users want informative, interesting, and, yes, even fun content. Companies need to focus on creating content that leaves their users wanting more.

Users don’t want to engage with brands that are pushing their products and services. Users want informative, interesting, and, yes, even fun content. Click To Tweet

Companies that are succeeding on social media are finding innovative and creative ways to relate to users. When you engage and get users involved in your story, you create long-lasting customer relationships. Storytelling creates an emotional bond with your company and drives brand loyalty.

Greg Hadden, executive creative director of Motive Made Studios, sums up the power of connecting with users: “What often gets lost is the fact that good storytelling is potent stuff. It has the power to make people want to believe and to belong, which is the goal of all storytellers. We’re all selling something, be it an idea, an exploration of the human condition, or say, a vacuum cleaner. It’s no mistake perhaps that good stories often create products.”

What social media mistakes do you try and avoid?

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Posts Tagged "content marketing strategy"


Video: Measure Social Media Success in Terms of Potential, not Dollar Amount

Video: Measure Social Media Success in Terms of Potential, not Dollar Amount

Social media’s ability to exponentially grow brand awareness and introduce your content to unseen audiences can’t always be measured in dollars.

One of the hardest parts about implementing a social media strategy is struggling to measure its success. While most B2B marketing professionals agree that a social media presence is crucial to any content marketing strategy, it can be hard to justify the investment when you can’t quantify the results.

“Social media is not just a spoke on the wheel of marketing. It’s becoming the way entire bicycles are built,” says Ryan Lilly, author.

This doesn’t mean that your business shouldn’t be diving — head first — into social media. With over 3.1 billion people using social media, businesses have to recognize the importance of social media as a part of a robust marketing strategy.

With over 3.1 billion people using social media, businesses have to recognize the importance of social media as a part of a robust marketing strategy. Click To Tweet

Marketers need to start thinking about social media success in terms of potential, instead of immediate dollars.

Social media: the reach

One of the most valuable aspects of social media is the ability to engage with new audiences, all the time. That means you not only have access to a new customer base, but to their connections as well.

When your followers engage with your brand on social media, they also engage with their own personal network. This organic reach is one of the most beneficial aspects of social media — and it’s not easy to put a dollar amount on. The potential to nurture leads and ultimately impact sales are huge, but it won’t happen overnight.

Here’s Kettie Laky, Social Media Director at Fronetics, to share why you need to frame social media success in terms of potential, and not just dollars.

Video: Measure social media success in terms of potential, not just dollars.

It’s time we start thinking about social media success in this new way: in terms of potential and expanding value, rather than just immediate dollar amounts. How have you worked to measure the success of your social media strategy?

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Posts Tagged "content marketing strategy"


Content Marketing vs. Your Sales Staff: Who Does What?

Content Marketing vs. Your Sales Staff: Who Does What?

When your content marketing and sales forces align their efforts, they form a powerful symbiotic relationship that grows your brand and your bottom line.   

There’s a big misperception out there that content marketing represents some kind of threat to the job security of sales personnel. It’s absolutely true that content marketing is an inbound approach, contrary to the traditional outbound approach of a B2B sales force. But make no mistake: Content marketing is not a substitute or replacement for an expert sales staff.

It’s absolutely true that content marketing is an inbound approach, contrary to the traditional outbound approach of a B2B sales force. But make no mistake: Content marketing is not a substitute or replacement for an expert sales staff. Click To Tweet

In fact, it’s when marketing and sales work in tandem that they’re most effective. They can help each other out to generate more leads, nurture current leads more effectively, and even help close more deals.

Content marketing helps generate a steady flow of quality leads, and it provides targeted information to usher prospects down the sales funnel. But even quality leads don’t turn into sales on their own. This is where a sales staff comes in, to take those leads and cultivate them into new business.

Content marketing and sales: Division of labor

For content marketing and sales to work seamlessly together, it’s important to have a clear idea of the role of each. They provide different touch points for leads at each stage of the buying cycle. Here’s a quick primer:

1. Forming a relationship

In this early stage of the buying cycle, your content marketing efforts go toward opening up a dialogue with potential customers. Often, potential leads’ first engagement with your brand comes when they read one of your blog posts, come across your website while searching for product solutions, or see one of your social media posts through their network.

This is when your sales staff picks up the ball, keeping that positive contact going by developing it into a conversation. It’s your sales team’s job to cultivate an ongoing personal relationship with that prospect.

2. Providing information

Now that you’ve established a relationship and your sales team is continuing a dialogue with your prospect, content marketing can step in. B2B buyers report spending more time than ever conducting research, using expert content such as vendor websites, user reviews, and social media before making purchasing decisions. The content that you share with prospects at this stage of the buyer’s journey should be designed to answer informed questions and tip the scales in your favor.

At this stage, your sales staff should be directly answering questions from prospects. When a potential customer reaches out with a query, it’s likely that he or she has done a fair amount of research. So your sales reps need to speak specifically to the customer’s needs in a way that content alone can’t do, to keep them interested and moving down the funnel.

3. Advocating for your brand

Content marketing increases brand awareness for your business. It helps elevate your brand position within the industry and keeps your business top-of-mind, even at a time when potential customers aren’t ready to make a purchase.

When a customer is preparing to make a purchase, your sales staff is the primary advocate for your brand. They should be proactive in pursuing business when customers show interest in your content or when they reach out with questions. They drive dialogue and get to know customers and how your business can help them.

A match made in heaven

When content marketing and sales work together, you’ll see the results hit your bottom line. Curating and creating great content will generate quality leads for your company. And it also empowers your sales force to build relationships with potential customers — and close the sale.

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Posts Tagged "content marketing strategy"


Video: How Often Should My Company Blog?

Video: How Often Should My Company Blog?

Here are our thoughts on how often your company should blog, including challenges and ways to overcome them.

Creating valuable, relevant content in a strategic and consistent manner creates demand for your products and services and drives profitable customer action. Blogging is a large part of the foundation of your content marketing strategy. If it’s not, it should be.

Blogging is a great way to attract traffic to your website, build brand awareness, and interact with new visitors. But, a question we get all the time is, “How often should my company blog?”

Blogging: frequency matters.

Blogging every once in awhile isn’t going to get you results. You need to publish quality content on a consistent basis to attract prospects to your site.

Blogging every once and awhile isn’t going to get you results. You need to publish quality content on a consistent basis to attract prospects to your site. Click To Tweet

The reality is that the more often you blog, the more traffic and leads you’ll get. Search engines consider posting frequency in their rankings. What’s more, every time you post, you create a new opportunity to be found, to be shared, and to be linked to by other sites.

Blogging: the challenge.

The trouble in publishing more posts is balancing resources so that you’re publishing frequently but maintaining value and quality within your content. We’re big advocates of testing to find your personal sweet spot for the amount of posts your organization is able to publish to maximize traffic and leads.

When you start publishing more frequently, make sure to track your KPIs, calculate ROI, and assess whether increasing blogging frequency is right for your business. You may be surprised at the results.

Here’s Elizabeth Hines, creative/editorial director at Fronetics, to discuss how often your company should be posting blogs.

Video: How often should my company blog?

How Often Should My Company Blog? from Fronetics on Vimeo.

Final thoughts.

Blogging needs to be a central part of your content marketing strategy. And unfortunately, it can take a while to start drawing traffic (and eventually, leads) from your posts. But the benefits of consistent blogging make it worth it.

And don’t forget, blog posts become more credible with age. That is to say, search engines value older content that has had more time to accumulate, like social shares and referrals from other web pages. The more relevant a blog post proves itself to be to readers over time, the higher it will rank in search engine results.

Have you tried blogging more frequently? Coming up with topics can be one of the biggest challenges. But don’t worry, we’ve got you covered.

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Posts Tagged "content marketing strategy"


Content Marketing is Not an Overnight Solution (More Like 12-18 Months)

Content Marketing is Not an Overnight Solution (More Like 12-18 Months)

You have to take the long view with content marketing, allowing time for your strategy to develop, your brand to build authority, and your sales cycle to play out.

When you undertake a new content marketing program, you’re making a big investment. So it makes sense that you want to start seeing immediate results. But it’s important to understand from the get-go that content marketing doesn’t really work like that. Yes, you’ll start seeing incremental results within the first few months. But what we tell our clients is that things aren’t really going to start cooking with gas until the 12-18 month mark.

I’ve written before about why you shouldn’t give up on content marketing after a short period of time. While you’ll probably see growth in web traffic, improved social reach, and generally better engagement metrics like time on page, you’re not likely to see new leads or sales to speak of in the first few months after instituting a content marketing strategy.

And that can be hugely frustrating. But the key is understanding that content marketing isn’t a gimmick, and it’s not a short-term strategy. It’s a long-term solution that, if allowed to germinate and grow for the long haul, helps you build brand awareness, grow your audience, and generate new leads and sales. When it comes to content marketing, your goal is to be the tortoise, not the hare.

Content marketing is not a short-term solution

In fact, rushing your relationship with content marketing is one of the worst things you can do. Let’s talk about why that is.

First off, content marketing isn’t a one-size-fits-all solution. You need to develop a strategy that works for your business, and that doesn’t happen overnight. When we first engage with a client at Fronetics, we generally take 30-45 days to do an in-depth dive into the company’s data to develop a custom strategy that aligns with the client’s specific business goals. It feels exhaustive at times, but it always ends up paying off.

According to the Content Marketing Institute, 11% of companies without a documented content marketing strategy find their efforts successful, compared to 60% of companies with a strategy in place. Click To Tweet

Keep in mind that only 11% of companies without a documented content marketing strategy find their efforts successful, compared to 60% of companies with a strategy in place. And that number rises to 86% when the company designates someone to lead the strategy.

The bottom line? Skipping this step to rush to results will pretty much ensure that your efforts won’t be worth it.

Building trust

In addition to the time it takes to develop a strategy, becoming an authority — and earning the trust and loyalty of your audience — takes time. Your goal is to be a consistent source of information and value, building your brand as an expert in the area.

It goes without saying that this doesn’t happen overnight. But it’s extremely well worth the effort and the patience. Remember that the average B2B buyer consumes between two and five pieces of content before making a purchase decision. If you can position your business as the premier expert on the subject by having the best, most informative, most helpful content available, you’ll have a leg up in the buyer’s decision.

Let the sales cycle play out

Once your strategy is documented and in place, and you begin to create and curate consistent, well-researched, high-quality content, there’s also the process of letting your sales cycle run its course. You need to allow your target audience time to find you and complete thorough research about you and your competitors before making a decision.

After all, content marketing can’t shorten your sales cycle. But lead nurturing with content can keep moving your prospects down the sales funnel. And content can help your sales team close deals. But you can’t expect a buyer to read your first blog post today and make a big purchase tomorrow. That’s just not realistic.

I cannot urge you enough: Don’t give up on content marketing before you give it time work. Hang in there long enough for your initial investment to pay off, and don’t be afraid to adjust your strategy along the way. If you stick with content marketing, it will generate those leads and sales you’re looking for.

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